What do you think about this?

What do you think?  I’m reading an article in the Richmond Times Dispatch (http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/business/local/article/REST06_20100105-221409/315598/#comments) about what tough economic times these are for the restaurant business. They have included a list of 30 restaurants that have closed recently. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I don’t see a smoking restaurant among them.

The smoking ban is also a very recent occurrence. I’m not a business man, but here’s my question. Given that there were about 20% of restaurants that allowed smoking prior to the ban serving the 23% of restaurant patrens that smoked.  And given that the 23% is still out there trying to squeeze into what may only be 2 or even less then 1% of restaurants that still have smoking. Why, with that kind of life preserver floating around would anyone let their restaurant go out of business? With an almost untapped market like this, (unless you just don’t have the space) would you allow your business to tank?

Right now, having a smoking restaurant is just good business. If 98% of restaurants are fighting for 70% of the customers, doesn’t that create one hell of a business opportunity for those willing to cater to the 20%?

Just what am I missing?

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6 Responses

  1. Moe,

    I have some back and forth going on at the comment section in Style Weekly. I really like the business math you are using here and am hereby informing you that I am stealing it to use in the comments section of Style Weekly. Thanks in advance!

    Mike

  2. Dr. Kabat, IAQC epidemiologist states “An association is generally considered weak if the relative risk is under 3.0 and particularly when it is under 2.0, as is the case in the relationship of ETS and lung cancer. Therefore, you can see any concern of second hand smoke causing lung cancer is highly questionable.” Note that the Relative Risk (RR) of lung cancer for persons drinking whole milk is 2.14 and all cancers from chlorinated water ranked at 1.25. These are higher risks than the average ETS risk. If we believe second hand smoke to be a danger for lung cancer then we should also never drink milk or chlorinated water.

  3. Since 1981 there have been 148 reported studies on ETS, involving spouses, children and workplace exposure. 124 of these studies showed no significant causal relationship between second hand smoke and lung cancer. Of the 24 which showed some risk, only two had a Relative Risk Factor over 3.0 and none higher. What does this mean. To put it in perspective, Robert Temple, director of drug evaluation at the Food and Drug Administration said “My basic rule is if the relative risk isn’t at least 3 or 4, forget it.” The National Cancer Institute states “Relative risks of less than 2 are considered small and are usually difficult to interpret. Such increases may be due to mere chance, statistical bias, or the effect of confounding factors that are sometimes not evident.” Dr. Kabat, IAQC epidemiologist states “An association is generally considered weak if the relative risk is under 3.0 and particularly when it is under 2.0, as is the case in the relationship of ETS and lung cancer. Therefore, you can see any concern of second hand smoke causing lung cancer is highly questionable.” Note that the Relative Risk (RR) of lung cancer for persons drinking whole milk is 2.14 and all cancers from chlorinated water ranked at 1.25. These are higher risks than the average ETS risk. If we believe second hand smoke to be a danger for lung cancer then we should also never drink milk or chlorinated water.

  4. […] more likely to just stay at home where they can smoke in their own home. This is interesting. All these restaurants going out of business. Not a smoking restaurant among them. […]

  5. […] Posted by Moe III This is interesting. All these restaurants going out of business. Not a smoking restaurant among them. Smokefreelyva.com Imagine that. […]

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